What happens if you don’t plan for your digital afterlife?

This is a new estate planning issue that becomes very personal, very fast. Not planning for online estate management creates a host of disasters for those who are left behind, says The Guardian in the article “What happens to our online identities when we die?”

Here’s just one aspect – a young woman with a loyal following online for her vlogs dies after a four-year battle with thyroid cancer. Six months after she dies, a message from her posts on Twitter. Her online friends are “freaked out,” says her mother.

digital afterlife

Another issue: what if you have accounts that you’d like to keep private? That may be a subscription to a shoe boutique or a website for married people seeking “outside” friends. What if you have a bank account that your spouse doesn’t know about? If no one knows that these accounts exist and a robust bank account evaporates (or your spouse has no idea why these crazy expensive shoes keep arriving), you’ve created a postmortem problem. Or lost money that maybe your family could use.

That’s what DCS handles for our users. We make it easy for users to build their portfolio of digital property, then make it easy to direct who is going to be able to handle the account information. The secret ones can be seen only by the person designated by the user. And after the user dies, DCS will carry out the user’s wishes, with the right information.

The Guardian explains it well:

Planning your digital death is not really about scheduling status updates for loved ones or building an AI avatar. In practice, it is a series of unglamorous decisions about deleting your Facebook, Twitter and Netflix accounts; protecting your email against hackers; bestowing your music library to your friends; allowing your family to download photos from your cloud; and ensuring that your online secrets remain hidden in their digital alcoves.

DCS takes it one step further and makes managing your digital properties easy. We make sure that all you have worked for, all that you have saved for and all that you have created online is properly passed on. Talk with your estate planning attorney about digital property and Directive Communication Systems, or visit www.ProtectMyPlans.com.